Monthly Archives: January 2014

A Year Some Montrealers Would Like To Forget

The year 2013 has finally passed! We could not be happier considering the preposterous events that brought Quebec to the forefront of international attention for all the wrong reasons. Montreal (its community, culture and economy), has definitely seen better times. Not only have we yet to recover from a sluggish economy and a deep-seated culture of corruption in the construction industry, but our city’s reputation was tarnished due to lack of common sense from civil servants and proposed government legislation that go against the grain of the city’s identity.

There were more than enough unfortunate and embarrassing events that left Montrealers with a serious distaste for politics in 2013. While it would require more time and bandwidth to highlight all of them here, we decided to pick several that stood out as reasons why Montrealers never want to see or experience some of the year that was.

The Not-So-Mysterious Case of Pastagate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In February 2013, upscale Italian restaurant Buonanotte made international headlines due to one angry, insecure patron and an overzealous inspector of the Office québécois de la langue française. The restaurant received a letter from the OQLF warning that use of words like “pasta” and “calamari” on its menu violated the language laws of Quebec. The nitpicking over the lack of French-equivalent words on the menu gave Montreal and the province much more attention than it needed. It drew international media attention from 14 countries.

The story certainly didn’t gain as much worldwide attention as the notorious Mayor Rob Ford; however, it was a stain on the reputation of the city of Montreal and a lesson in poor public relations for Quebec. Among the media channels showing us as a laughing stock to the world were the [...]

January 15th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments|

Press Release: January 14, 2014

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION

Montreal, January 14, 2014: Canadian Rights in Quebec (“CRITIQ”) calls on the Quebec government to address reports that the provincial government is instructing its ministries and agencies not to communicate in English with businesses or organizations established in Quebec. It also encourages ministries to avoid translating the entirety of their websites into English.

Such polices are an overextension of Quebec language laws in a way that prevents a broad number of citizens from having access to vital information. This policy potentially compromises the viability of businesses as well as compliance with safety and other standards. This is yet another mechanism that serves to hinder business development in Quebec and a demonstration of the secrecy under which our government operates.

Such actions create second-class citizens and denies minorities in Quebec their guaranteed rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as Canada’s Official Languages Act. CRITIQ calls on the government to stop employing illegal and repressive tactics to supress minorities in the name of the majority, and at the expense of all.

Canadian Rights in Québec (“CRITIQ”) is a Québec-based organization dedicated to the protection in Québec of those rights and freedoms vested in all Canadian citizens by our nation’s constitution, as well as by those international conventions by which Canada is bound.

For further information, contact Media Relations at (514) 360-3236

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January 14th, 2014|Press Releases|0 Comments|

Press Release: January 9, 2014

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION

Montreal, January 9, 2014: Canadian Rights in Quebec (“CRITIQ”) calls on the Quebec government to address reports by the Canadian Institute of for Identities and Migration that the number of Quebecers departing for other provinces has reached unprecedented levels for this century.

Between January and September of 2013 nearly 30,000 people left Quebec for other provinces, taking with them their money, skills and talents. It is evident that this exodus coincides with the election of the Parti-Quebecois and its continued emphasis on divisive policies rather than strengthening the economy.

In the past, the provincial government has tried to counter migration by encouraging more international immigration. However, with the proposal of Bill 60 and last year’s fervent efforts by the OQLF it is doubtful that new immigrants will chose Quebec over other more economically minded provinces.

According to Jack Jedwab, the situation is a result of the declining economy and levels of migration coincide with recession indicators. We ask that our elected officials abandon divisive politics and redirect the conversation to attract foreign economic investment, stop brain-drain, and encourage local entrepreneurs and businesses.

Canadian Rights in Québec (“CRITIQ”) is a Québec-based organization dedicated to the protection in Québec of those rights and freedoms vested in all Canadian citizens by our nation’s constitution, as well as by those international conventions by which Canada is bound.

For further information, contact Media Relations at

(514) 360-3236

January 9th, 2014|Press Releases|0 Comments|